Return to the Main Menu
Click here to expand   Click here to expand   Click here to expand   Click here to expand   Click here to expand
Nobori-hige
 
Oto
 
Buaku
 
Usofuki (Coll. Sengoro Shigeyama)
 
Kitsune (Coll. Sengoro Shigeyama)

Ebisu; Daikoku; Bishamon; Fuku no Kami; Nobori-hige; Oji; Hana-biki; Buaku; Oto; Ama; Kentoku; Usofuki; Kitsune; Saru; Tanuki; Hakuzosu; etc.

The Nobori-hige mask is worn by the Ai-kyogen in a Noh drama in which he plays the role of the god of a subsidiary shrine. The smiling expression of its open, toothless mouth gives a better hint of human goodness than of sacredness. The Oto mask is often used to portray ugly women, but it is also used by characters who disguise themselves as the deity Jizo. The Buaku mask is like a Kyogen version of the Noh Beshimi, and although it is a demon mask, its humorous expression is not frightening. The Kentoku mask is used for the spirits of non-human beings, such as horses, cows, dogs, and crabs. The Usofuki mask looks like it is whistling, and is used for the spirits of mosquitoes and mushrooms. The Kitsune mask is used for the old fox in Fox Trapping, the highest-ranking Kyogen play. In the Edo period, it seems that there were many realistic animal masks use, but today only the fox (Kitsune), monkey (Saru), and badger (Tanuki) remain.

Return to "The Masks of Kyogen" Menu
Return to the Main Menu
Copyright 2004, by the Japan Arts Council. All rights reserved.